Main Office:  (512) 327-9595
On-Air:  (512) 390-1370
Comment Line:  (512) 329-KJCE (5523)
| More
KJCE 1370AM>Audio on Demand>>Inside Austin, 07/13/2014

Inside Austin, 07/13/2014

Jul 13, 2014|

Salvation Army of Central TX recruiting for Disaster Relief Services team; Pollyanna Theatre Company's educational prgram.

Related Audio:

  1. Inside Aus 083114

    Audio

    Thu, 4 Sep 2014

    APIE celebrates 10 years of flagship coaching program. Callie Langford from Casa Programs of Greater Austin shares support needed for Casa Superhero Run.

  2. Inside Aus 082414

    Audio

    Thu, 4 Sep 2014

    APIE shares volunteer opportunities as they celebrate 10 years of classroom coaching. Strut Your Mutt Run/Walk benefit coming up next month.

  3. Inside Aus 081714

    Audio

    Thu, 4 Sep 2014

    APIE celebrates 10 years of their Classroom Coaching Program. Austin Emerging Arts Leaders discuss summer fund-raiser for unique scholarship fund. Ben-Willie-Darrell Links & Lyrics Gala.

  4. Inside Aus 081014

    Audio

    Thu, 4 Sep 2014

    Cindy Rowe of the Blood Center of Central Texas shares Pint for Pint promotion with Blue Bell ice Cream. Tony Morris shares the healing power of music with his Music in Medicine Program .

+

Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

It's Sunday July 12 -- listening to inside -- -- the Salvation Army -- central Texas is looking for a few good men and women for their disaster relief services team. And lieutenant colonel Henry Gonzales is here to remind us of all the ways -- Salvation Army helps during times of disaster. Keep listening and you might find yourself ready to volunteer. I'm also speaking with Judy much -- scandal she's the artistic director for the Pollyanna theater company. Shall share review how they work alongside educators to inspire motivate and teach audiences of all ages. Especially children that's all coming up next on inside Austin. It. One day and teach chemistry to kids and -- looking architects of. My dream is to Galicia. This is a world of possibilities -- the world in which people who have put their minds to something that can really make a difference. My goal to help -- -- -- someday they'll find a cure for cancer yeah. The US department of education's office of federal student -- didn't really believe that inspiring nineteen achieving anything. So we're getting ourselves and making sure everyone has an opportunity to go to colleagues. Each year and we provide more than 115 million dollars ransom bones and works at a time yeah higher education possible for any time. -- -- -- I can go back to college they can change careers and I can make a difference. -- seem to need proud sponsor of the American mind. Learn more about money for college student aid got up. I heard on the news outlets I -- has found his -- stand. She didn't know it was -- I heard on the news about that fourteen year old girl -- bullied don't mind really a year she can -- -- and she she got her dad's gun from his nightstand. Yeah. That. Could broken instrument tasks -- country's hot -- She accidentally shot his cousin in the hands she killed herself yeah. -- directions around. If you only done it you have a full time responsibility. When you weren't using it -- sure can't get into the hands of curious children. Troubled teenagers -- or anyone else who might -- Houston. Your family friends and neighbors are all -- -- remember all the. Markets for more information on firearm storage safety presidency PC -- -- This message brought to you by the national crime prevention council the bureau of justice assistance and -- council. We have a stronger than we looked tight I've had type one diabetes since I was two and finger than you think tank. I have to take insulin shots every single day and the type that sees beyond the incense and meant to be overcome. To researched -- -- this funding -- its life changing. Where the planned -- here tonight tonight on I have type one -- will be sending you still had the closer do you think tight. Things like the artificial pancreas they -- ideas they're happening right now the type that will stop at nothing. No more blood sugar tests and absolutely nothing no more insulin jacks until type one becomes tight none. Support GE RS the world's largest -- your tank when I mean easy six. So one day you can see and I helped turn tiger wanting to tape tonight so he's snapped and he acts done Iraq. And spend your past and I can't. Did you know there's approximately two million veterans throughout the state of Texas. And 40000 in the Austin area alone -- and our newest project strives to support each one of them and their families are conducting dare you to retreat holiday dinners. H -- which he believes a whole -- serves and the best way to support the troops is not supporting the family. We support all veterans and active duty soldiers from all branches for more information -- services visit us at HOH project that war. Again that's HOH project down. Award. At the next questions what to look cooking a stick of gum and of French -- have in common. And I and you find them between capital. The -- cost more than filing your taxes. It's higher risk refile its free get a choice of brand -- software in helping he needed to join the forty million people who have already -- Three files it's fast it's safe it's free get started at free file the IRS dot Duff. For America's wounded warriors. Coming home can sometimes to -- in -- itself. Making the transition back to civilian life for active duty with the traumatic injury. Can be challenged thanks to. The USO provides every American way to support our wounded warriors and their families. -- every phase of their medical treatment. And lenient. Tell all of us as a community. Can give something back to our heroes. It's how we can save the and assured them that their sacrifice in being recognized and appreciated. Join us. Visit US soon dot org to learn how you can make a difference in the lives of wounded warriors and their -- The US and. Can do to. My first. And all of the Salvation Army. Was back in nineteen news report or your report. I was eight years ago we had a letter and our community. And Salvation Army and provide services. And now. Never forgotten and it's about my first. Encounter with Salvation Army just to see. Salvation Army officers and volunteers. The services it was very moving even -- eight year old boy. -- it and see him take the time. Two. And Stanley are soft drink. I bet that made a big impression really dead and that's something that. Step Whitman. You know throughout -- active authorship and even to this day. Remember it as if it were yesterday. Just amazing to see these people. Give you things. Will -- who you know there's. No experience involved -- -- They gave us. Peter forgive you -- -- the amnesty. When you really. Aren't situation we're. -- you. Mean when you're down -- now when you reach out. The various. Bottom. And to have someone who's reached down and just pick you -- You know. And it's just scary and vulnerable time polio in exactly and that's an excellent offense. If you're just now joining us on inside art and science speaking with lieutenant colonel Henry Gonzales of the Salvation Army central Texas. And we're talking about the disaster relief services that the Salvation Army provides. I'm so glad we're having this conversation because I do think it still today even with all the wonderful work Salvation Army does and the community when it comes to disaster relief. Do you think the first thing folks think of is donating their clothes are donating their furniture and that is very important. The salvation army's stores that we -- But there's an incredible amount of resources that go into disaster relief in this community. On the state level oftentimes even on a federal level and I think it's important for people to know all that the Salvation Army -- First of all would like to say that the Salvation Army has been and involved in disaster work for many many years. In fact he was. September the sixth 19100. The hurricane that hit. Galveston. -- know 5000. People. Was it juices of the Salvation Army disaster services. -- from that point forward to this third day. On the Salvation Army has been very involved in providing disaster services to people. We view this as in ministry. And trying to help our our neighbors. Trying to view of support to those who are need to the Salvation Army. Not only in this country rule on worldwide. Is very involved in providing -- services -- in time disaster. The Salvation Army is recognized by the federal government. As a disaster agency in the Salvation Army was very involved in the formation of FEMA. So Salvation Army has a lot of experience. Working now. With. Natural and man and man made disasters. And so what are some of the ways the Salvation Army -- army currently serves in disasters to -- The Salvation Army surge and Turkish monitors. And volunteers. And victims. Immediately. When the Salvation Army -- on Hussein. That we provide food -- clothing. Shelter. Wow councilman. -- Tuesday a day. In large. Array of items at the Salvation Army provides just dependent on the scope of the disaster. And want to protect her knees or at that at that time. It's that's what dictates. What we do. Enough in our disaster services. That's really customized. Everything it really is. As everything's different like I know some of the ones you helped out with the Halloween floods in 2013 those need to be very different from. The explosion that happened in west Texas and the fires and -- strap as well as many others. You you're you're exactly right in just so happens that there are at the October 31 load on the following this refer to it. For the -- -- the second time in the state of Texas a celebration army. Was able to utilize a specially made vehicle. That as several washing machines and dryers. And know the Salvation Army was able to provide. Services. Were. The victims could come and wash their clothes. And or someone to be in this situation for a period of several weeks. Army get there. Over and launched -- pain. It was very satisfying. And the individuals were just thrilled that they put on clean clothes to really. It just depends. Again. -- that particular disaster dictation that we do. The Salvation Army has expertise in and a in Orange. Area of -- skills. We have people that carry out a certain responsibilities. We refer to him especially this. Again it just depends for example they may be that. In a very bad disaster. Worked communications are down on the Salvation Army has his own. Ham radio. Network. With the salvation are making Crimea. And get word out to and the members. Have the victims. Be able to communicate and remembers so it just depends. On the scope of of the disaster. And that again determines what serves -- All right so interesting because something as simple as having clean clothes so where we do that every day we can't take your granite and that can piece either destabilizing. Or stabilizing then when -- When you have that. Resource back -- able to just -- like yourself and like your feeder on the ground against something as simple as clean clothes. Oh you're you're you're absolutely right in. And that is just amazing how the people came up in just expressed her appreciation. And again it's a simple line in -- -- we do take for granted. When you have to do without -- close for a period of time. And when you when you do have the opportunity to wash your clothes. As it feels great. And I think it's important to recognize that bring you is your donations. Through Salvation Army Austin dot com. 100%. Of that of those donations and not a penny less goes directly to the disaster relief is not right. You're you're absolutely right that's -- man thing. It really is so we are committed. To. Reform him. Disaster services. And we just feel that when people give. Contribution. To a disaster. At a 100% of that should go directly to that disaster to -- Individuals. On the Salvation Army made that. Commitment many many years ago. That win. There is a disaster. When someone donates to that particular disaster. Those aren't used on portion then and I say that particular disaster because what we do we encourage. The donor to. Specifically mention. That particular disaster. Because what happens is if you don't do that. And those funds go into a special. Disaster fund. Now it is huge for that. Particular disaster may be going on time. But it is donors specifies that this -- to go to this particular disaster. And all that money goes to that disasters cannot be used for any other disaster. Until there -- there's a waiting period about three years at the at the end of three years. It all the disaster services have been performed all the major met. Then and only men -- those funds transfer back to the to be general disaster. For example there in Katrina and you -- Salvation army's. Spent millions of dollars. Now. That disaster occurred in 2000 and well we were there for six years. We really appreciate -- providing services. And and we headed the last and you know the six year when the government says its its Spanish. We had to go back into -- ones. To double check to make sure. And all knees were taking care because there was a surplus. A couple of million dollars. And we had to wait. Three additional years. Before those arms we transferred back to -- general. Disaster. -- his interest and had no idea but I area limited the army is really committed and we do our art our our. Dead level best to. Carry out the wishes of the donor. And so we always say if you wanna give to this particular. Disaster be sure and indicate. Its name right down the name of the of the particular disaster. And again a 100% of those funds go to that mr. Am sure the folks that are. Providing these services during a disaster give a dedicated team of people that are responders. We do and know those individuals to be your neighbors and volunteers Giuliani could be someone down the street. It can be someone that has -- passion. To help people. -- can be someone that has. That adventurous spirit. Of just you know going out and and and in doing something. These individuals. Come to us. And they. They become part of our volunteer to name. And an order for want to become a member of the team they have to go through very. A very. Detailed training. Before they are allowed to leverage of the Salvation Army. In a disaster. But of these can be school teachers via. Attorney hit this. People from the from the public people who just wanna do good even that won't help. Someone else and what we do this week in week these individuals come to us and we -- we provide the necessary training. We have. Several. Layers or levels of training. From a novice. Two to the specialists. The Salvation Army make sure that these individuals are training qualified. -- more before they go out. So we take this very seriously every quarter we have a mock disaster. -- Jersey new technique becomes out. And that information shared with our volunteers because we will be sure. That. Individuals who represented the Salvation Army. Are well trained and qualified to. To perform these services like -- are you need right now volunteers. Are at the disaster response team. A yes we are as you know we're in aren't we just well we use energy disaster season and a few weeks ago. To right now. Partners -- tropical storm brewing. On the East Coast of of Florida. I said yes they would move us to. Individuals men and women are willing to go. And and to serve in some capacity. The Salvation Army and we have some can Carney has an excellent. -- volunteer team. There -- a group of about fifteen million women. Who are really dedicated. In providing no services in term of art in terms of disaster but here in -- Travis counting. We do not -- out. The group of volunteers. Who are willing to come on a regular basis. You go out on the radio on a disaster no we don't. We don't anticipate. Every volunteer going out every time there's a disaster that. -- -- -- -- And require that kind of commitment. But we know that there are there individuals in this community that would love to do this. They may have time. And we want those individuals to. Joined there disaster volunteer team. And help us to provide support to our neighbors. Have somebody does one of volunteer and you mentioned a little earlier than them just about anybody can can become a volunteer income for the training. What is their responsibility mean how big of a commitment is there. Well here again it depends on how much time they want to devote. We have some are volunteers to go out just about every town there called on. And it could be. Somewhere in south Texas are to be somewhere on the east as. There are others at may go out. Every three or four times. When their call. So it just depends on how much time someone has to give. But again you know we welcome. Anyone who like to. To try. -- if this is something they wanted to commit to love him to come out and visit us and talk with our professionals. And get a first -- feel. -- what it takes to be and volunteer on disaster remember that's -- -- idea what kind of what kind of training do they can't specifically. Well of it could be. Emergency preparedness. -- how to operate a vehicle. How to. Cook in a in a mobile canteen. Someone may want to. Via ham operator. There's a lot of things that they can do big variety of things well there you out do. There's a great variety of things I'm -- say that if there's someone in the community as a special skill. Probably nine or ten times that that the tickers you could be used in time disaster. And here we have. We have pastors that come home boredom. From council which we have social workers that will come -- -- counseling services so -- just. You know -- just depends. If someone comes to us with a special skill we try to and that. That place just -- you know where they would feel very comfortable. And provide enough. That knowledge of that training into. When it strikes me what do wise and strategic approach to disaster relief because you have those immediate. Needs of basic survival. Food water clothing shelter but then of course you have the emotional and spiritual component of having been completely destabilize that an individual or as a family. So to really approach it from that. Whole human perspective. I think it's so important. It it it really is said the Salvation Army -- -- take care. Of the physical needs. And in the spiritual needs of an individual. Because that's very important especially in time of disaster. When you know -- you or your lowest. And you really need support. Someone else so Salvation Army is a eight based organization. And propriety in and spiritual counseling. In and out. Christian leadership. Literature or perhaps and -- Bible. That's part of who we are and now we take that very seriously. We -- -- had today as saying we improve the founder of the Salvation Army. Soup soaps operation. And that is you know you take care of the physical needs first interview room. -- -- -- you clean them up and -- if the opportunity arises were. You. Where you can talk them about spiritual matters any you know you do that it's -- not gonna think about spiritual things when they're dirty. Hard Hungary absolutely and it's very welfare and if you're just now joining us on inside us and I'm having a conversation with lieutenant colonel Henry Gonzales of the Salvation Army we're talking about their disaster response team. And salvation is currently looking to recruit more individuals for this team right now training starts in September. And what is the best way for folks to get more information. Or if they know they wanna become a volunteer candidates China. Where they can do that by going to our web site. Salvation Army Austin dot org. The black is on FaceBook arm Salvation Army Austin. And then of course on Twitter. At. -- army. Austin there are three ways there that some regions. If someone wants to give us a call you know. They can do that we -- your area we'd like to make ourselves. Accessible. In available. So are there are several ways that an individual can reach us. And we will be more than delighted to visit with him and see if their candidate or room. Or someone new. Sherwood is only -- pastor. House gets -- it's work that is so important for the community. And if you think you might be interested in becoming a volunteer -- you know someone who would be interest at. He can get more information at Salvation Army Austin dot org I'll mention again because I think it's so important win win individuals donate during a disaster. 100%. Of the benefits of that particular disaster that money goes to that event that disastrous event and stays at that event. So that's an important information if you know you can't volunteer but you would like to donate some financial resources to all of could work. That the Salvation Army does in the community particularly around disaster and Salvation Army Austin dot org is the place to go. Is there anything else that you would like looks to know about the Salvation Army in general or about the needs that you currently have with the disaster response team. The salvation army -- very unique organization. I don't I'm gonna some -- me officer or 46 years. In. Some -- and I'm amazed. And -- Salvation Army. Is doing. It seems like there's always something new. But the Salvation Army is trying now or is involved. Salvation Army is an organization that is not stagnant. Always evolving always changing always grow and that's good because I think is very important for the army to keep current with. Times. There have been many great organizations in the past many great social church organizations. But somewhere along the way. They were not able to adjuster and now. And they held by the wayside. So I. And I believe. Judea and I'm very sincere about this is it's because of who we are. We are they base. We do what we do not on herself or me we don't try to build a kingdom. We do what we do because we are we obeyed the command. Of our lord. We see it go out. Laden and seek laws and help. Robert Byrd and go in be a neighbor so while the Salvation Army does set in. -- The audience who imposed it is just I'm very sincere about. And I just believe that as long as we are true to our call him at the Salvation Army will remain very. Active organization. That. Meeting the needs of the and that's the bottom line is to serve people. And now again we do not take -- very. Well thank you so much for being here and sharing that because of Salvation Army as an organization that we all need. In if you would like to get involved if you'd like to become a volunteer for their disaster response team. There is no time like the present more information -- Salvation Army Austin dot org. You can like their face that patients more information their Salvation Army Austin and on Twitter. At -- army -- Lieutenant colonel Henry Gonzales of the Salvation Army thank you so much for being here and sharing -- Thank you. Back in a moment with more insight -- I heard on the news outlets I fearless has found his -- -- -- -- didn't know it was loaded. I heard on the news about that fourteen year old girl who was bullied don't mind really a year she can teach -- and she she got her dad's gun from his nightstick. Yeah. That. -- broken instruments. -- -- -- -- She accidentally shot his cousin in the hands as she killed herself yeah. -- -- trying to round. If you only done you have a full time responsibility. When you weren't using it -- sure can't get into the hands of curious children troubled teenagers thief or anyone else who might -- Houston. Your family friends and neighbors are all -- and remember all the. Markets for more information on firearm storage safety presidency PC double. This message brought to you by the national crime prevention council the bureau of justice assistance and get through. -- When they teach chemistry kits and -- architects of my dream is to Galicia. This is a world of possibilities but the world in which people who have put their mind to something that can really make a difference. My goal to help -- -- and someday they'll find a cure for cancer yeah. The US department of education's office of federal student -- didn't really believe that aspiring nineteen achieving anything from. So we're getting ourselves and making sure everyone has an opportunity to go to colleagues. Each year and we provide more than 115 million dollars in grants and -- and works at a time. Higher education possible for any -- -- decent life. Thank -- go back to college they can change careers and I can make a difference. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- We have a stronger than we looked tight I had type one diabetes since I was two and -- than you think tank. I have to take insulin shots every single day and the -- that sees beyond the sense they're meant to be overcome. To research -- -- its funding it's like changing. Where the plans -- here tonight nine I don't ten point I mean he's will be something that you step had the closer do you think tight. Things like the artificial pancreas they -- ideas and they're happening right now to tell people stop at nothing. No more blood sugar tests and absolutely nothing no more until it jacks until type one becomes tight none. Support GE RS the world's largest -- of tank when I mean easy six. So one day you can say I helped turn tiger wanting to tape tonight so he's -- an easy act and Iraq. And spend your past and I can't. For America's wounded warriors. Coming home can sometimes in the battle itself. Making the transition back to civilian life for active duty with the traumatic injury. Completely challenged the right time. The USO provides every American way to support our wounded warriors and their family. To every phase of their medical treatment. And lenient. To tell all of us as a community. Can give something back to -- here. It's how we can save the and assured them that their sacrifice. Is recognized and appreciated. Visit US soon dot org to learn how you can make a difference in the lives of wounded warriors and their -- The US it. -- Do. -- How about the -- theater I. Have not familiar with at all -- been an option years and I feel I'm some governments well you are not wearing masks it is because we've had a large presence with the public schools. And so -- a lot of our audience is under the age of six. -- -- and that makes that's exactly right. We have started out we were primarily at touring company we did a lot of work in schools. And then we also are performing at the gallery art center. And then when he -- center and we have moved there and we perform in the Rollins studios' theater on Centre or times a year so we're year round program it's all adult professional theater artists that create performed theater for children. So if you were in elementary school and middle school. And you've heard of the -- either company we had that many of the students will we -- that a lot of teachers will because that's a lot of what we do is supporting general education and 32. Study guides and that kind of information we share with teachers. And we bring each of our productions papering and public school and private school children in to the one center to see her work. As well as perform on the weekends for -- and -- audience and how many shows our nation today how many different productions thank you we do for productions a year -- that would keep you heard it yet so we are very busy company. -- -- an ensemble. Six or any. Professional actors and designers. And myself and company stage manager. And we always are working on something new we usually have three or four news scripts and works and development at all times it takes a spot a year and how is it mostly original this year all original material we worked directly with -- we commissioned work from. I'm not only local. People but also from clearance from around the country. And interest and okay so if you're just joining us on inside Austin. And speaking with Judy much -- Campbell she is the executive director of the Pollyanna theater company. And I I gather the mission has somewhat educational related in terms of your audience being only children. Well yes and no by its very nature theatre for young audiences. Is educational because everything we do is providing. A cultural experience for young people which I think is. Is a very basic part of their general education but we also -- link we always buy links between our productions. And the curriculum as well. So we made the say for instance. The working with the students on their math skills. -- and we're doing a production like plus and minus the vacation adventure which was the production we did this last may. -- specifically for pre K and kindergarten. It was a way to bring a beginning math skills to life before their very -- and so we went into classrooms and did teaching our partner campuses. Through our strategic alliance with the long center. That sounds really. Helped children understand basic math that we did it through the arts. And then it culminated with bringing them to the long center for their very first field trip seem to see our live performance so we try to be as creative as we -- about how we really emerged. Pop art that we're creating with their curriculum. And serving them as best we can with. Assisting their teachers with their curriculum material. And is a hoax that some students will be inspired and wanna learn more about theaters themselves can -- I can tee how there are still many applications later in life having had a little bit of -- were a year now. We. If some of these children that -- our work decide they want to the computer artists apps re. But that's secondary to our overall -- our overall goal is to help them learn about themselves. Helped them learn about each other. Help them learn about. Healthy ways to deal with conflict because conflict is at heart of all that theater. And it really opera gives an opportunity. To have a rich -- curious learning experience and by that I mean. Oliver plays there's a character that children can really identify when it's somebody that is a young protagonist or child like protagonist. That they can go -- that persons like me and they're going through something that is. Like when I'm going three and they get to have that opportunity to see how that character. Deals with that I'm an active and comes out successful. So we think that that's a very powerful way -- life lessons as well as my sister from the curricula. That does make sense and it also creates. A dialogue to go home and talked to mom and dad and say exactly what I saw today in this with self interest and I wonder about that exactly and you know sometimes children. Don't necessarily have. The same kind of emotional vocabulary that we did and don't have the life experiences that make it possible for them to sit down to have those conversations and healthy way. But I would so much rather have them experience those. As strong emotions in a safe controlled environment like theater for the first time then they can -- home. And say hi I saw today -- play about this young boy who was being bullied and this is how he dealt with that and this was the outcome. And it gave me some ideas about how I can enrich my own life. Through web -- protagonist. So helpful to see those lessons it really has and it's so much. I think healthier for them to be able to have that experience with. They're classmates. Sitting around them they're all going through it's a shared experience. You know we had a teacher when time came to me and said the -- I love about your plays is that when the lights go down their perfect equality. My children that are from affluent families. And my children you are from being -- -- you are from very challenged backgrounds. All are having the same experience all the same time and they're coming away. With the same emotional experience. As well as real experience. And we think that's one of the most powerful things that arts and it. They may have completely different backgrounds when they came into school that day but I have this very rich. -- experience that's shared in the theaters that -- and that teacher can go back and used to expand her hypocrite. What did she say when the lights go down there's -- quality -- perfect equality. -- I mean that's very profound for that experience also reminds me of living in Manhattan because when the electricity went out. Same thing happened exactly matter what you socioeconomic and -- it. It was here and I -- I hired a gallon him and I think that's one of the powers that be -- because you have that's strong identity. With. Protagonists. Are holing caged in infested in the journey that app protagonist is rolling on line. -- you're all sharing. That same experience. Regardless of you know the size of your home or whether you're a single parent household. Or. What. You know printing issues right yeah absolutely brilliant thing. So the good neighbor -- education project is that something new that the Pollyanna theater company of wanting we went into strategic alliance with the long center about like it's almost three years ago account. And what is -- is through shared services. We are reaching out to the schools that are located closest to the -- senator. Well we did was we looked at a city Matt and it's as if you dropped a pebble right on top of the -- center and those concentric circles. Where the deepest impact of that rock is. We drew it a two mile. Ring around that round beautiful brown building and said you really are closest neighbors who are these children. What are they face saying. What other challenges what's their background and how do we really changed their lives through arts has this is the building a cultural center that they're driving by everyday right. And so we found that with -- not reading their seven elementary schools all kind of significant. Risk emperor. And each has three of them to start -- act. And week go into those classrooms. Around. Site for instance. And last October we were doing a piece called the -- -- let monsters in the -- who left peace. And it was all about sibling rivalry from and it was also all about. Be careful what you wish for. The young protagonist -- wished for a monster that accompanied his family because he was very angry at them and while -- piece on his -- became a monster. And so it was very much about those -- personal relationships. And that use of childlike imagination so we used it as a springboard for creative writing and second great concerts. So we -- and a second -- classrooms on three of our partner campuses. And top four or five weeks. People that I would and see onstage. Coming into their classrooms helping them learn to use their writing skills more. And really using all of that time. The play and beams from the play characters from the plane moments from the -- that they are gonna come to seat as a spring board for. Springboard for their own writing. And working with those teachers to set and how arts could really. Helped them reach does does very basic. I'll learning objectives in their class -- consumption original and then we. I think that thing that's awesome about what we are able to do and that partnership. Is that Dan every single one of this. -- a series of classes culminates with the experience of coming to -- on -- and all those children who -- our guests. He kind of see the play but they'd been hearing about writing about. And they soft familiar faces on the State's largest banking they must be that much more invested because they are you have relationships that have been building in the classroom in the name recognized people on -- exactly. Exactly and we think that. That did the important one of the really important parts of this work is that it's a sustained. Relationship. It's sustained. Educational relationship with the students on the east campus. So. The children or work in left in pre K and kindergarten classrooms on those campuses. In May. Our goal is to for their entire five or six years that they may be on back here at -- they have repeated relationships with us. We're going into their classroom again maybe in the second eight NIC -- and and -- -- coming in back to the wants and but I know that the on center is a resource for examined at those stores are open to -- not just a -- -- building where. Grownups right it's also a place that the doors are open for them. Very important if you're just not joining us on inside Austin I'm having a conversation with cutie -- Campbell she's the artistic director of appalling theater company. And Judy you just had a production opened yesterday and last until about that it is cop Peter in the -- it's by holly had -- by. And it's it's a new modern adaptation. The pied piper of Hamlin back classic. Tail and that is hundreds of years old. But what I love to do with plays is look at classic stories like that and so I I wonder what this is a classic why is it that. You know over hundreds of years we keep telling this story to each other into our children what. What is it about what's going on in the story that makes it important to -- Ants so what why do we don't know about it and why don't we tell children a tale about. This strange musical. Magical man that comes and takes the children way. Law if -- -- -- that that's not paying. -- story we forget it really is there. So what -- on and that story and what is it about it so for for I mean they answered that really is about that. It's a cautionary tale about what happens if you start following them around people. What happens if and and also what happens if people who are basically honorable integrity -- people like did -- not world. If -- don't any suddenly forget how important it is to be a to beat people up there where they promised to pay the piper and make it. You know and so there are consequences to actions like. And how easy it is for all of us -- where children or adults to. Sometimes let those basic. Points of integrity fall by the wayside. But they do always have consequences. The piper does always have to eventually be paid. Yeah and I would sound much rather have. Children and parents. Together. And theaters seeing that story that they can talk about. And it's also it's a -- find peace because my -- has and is take rap and hip hop. As. The way the piper pipes up. And has created some -- -- characters. I am Pollyanna and sort of known as a place where one mom -- laughing hysterically and the next moment. You catch your breath because someone says something or does something that makes you stop and think. And displayed does that line. There's one character in particular. -- Brad -- left behind his name is Julius. And -- Julius. Is. Warren. Part because his whole -- he is gone. But he's also very funny -- cut its key plays that you politely and comforts himself with these strange little songs that he makes that. So for one minute you're laughing hysterically at Julius. And the next minute you're thinking who wander by. These children. Our all. Following this kind of scary and and so it it's a real -- I think. Of thoughtful humor. And kind of a modern take on a dairy -- to Mary -- so that opened yesterday at the long dinner is and it folks wanna get tickets did they go to the long senate dot -- to yes they do come all of our public performances. Or on weekends the tickets are sold through a long summer box not just. And they do is log on can also learn more about asset Pollyanna. Theater -- ORG. And there's a link for the tickets -- well and you got them quite a few performances coming up and sons Haley and I pay what you like party yeah. Our Sunday afternoon teams are always followed by. I pay what you like party in the AT&T room which is -- education room there at the long center. It's right across the lobby from the Rollins we all come out of the theater together and it's a time when the families can meet cast. And have their pictures taken the characters and have some refreshments. And maybe Sudan and drop picture together and actually I'll talk about the play and just have a good time. So this is terrific because if you're son or daughter is in school in. In one of the schools I guess is not really your direct partner based on the geography why this gives us a wonderful opportunity for everyone to come I think. Regardless of what's clear and but. How nice to come as a family to see something that's gonna be fun and educational and not have to worry about how. It's being set on stage. And it's also I think it's really fun too because it it we want our families to be able to come alongside and so Pollyanna works very hard to keep our ticket prices well within him. The range of -- Hopefully almost any Austin -- -- can can afford. Our shows are very accessible in we have a lot of people that come in with their children aside this is the very first time that we brought. Our child to the -- To see a play and we get really excited that we love being off tea child's first experience of sharing that is really memorable yeah. I saw her arm of the first plan I shot at Allen -- in Houston. You always remember that first time that the lights go down and the stage lights come up and some amazing professional actors standing there in front of you and your whole. Perspective on the world shifts if it -- incredible growth it's almost like taking a little vacation in the way that it changes your perspective. You know Pollyanna I think one of the things that that makes it difficult for us. Is that every bit of our resources aspect and our programming and I think that's why a lot of people don't know about us now that's why having an opportunity to have this conversation with you and it's huge gift to -- Because we want more and more families to know about what we do that we don't think harmony and to a lot of marketing. We don't. You know we're we're not out there are doing a whole lot advertising that. That make people know about -- so this opportunity is is. Is really. Well I think you're putting your money where it should go because these tickets are truly affordable I mean I'm seeing 775. For children under 12875. For students you've got. A senior -- you've got a group rates 975 for adult I mean this is a great opportunity to spend actually less than you would going to the movies. Our goal is to make sure that the -- can always come and see something live. -- at the same or less than it would cost to -- first and I think that is a great goals so if you're feeling entrusted. I sure am and I have children to take. Got a shooter we do have a lot of adults that come to see our shows quite frankly I think Q why honestly. Tickets are available at the long centered dot org you can learn lots more there about the Pollyanna theater company. And speaking with Judy not -- Campbell she is there artistic director. I know this is a nonprofit theater company -- oh yeah -- view on -- the match and always looking for resources donations and any kind. Absolutely. Our. Basic principle is that no child is turned away from Pollyanna production because of their ability to paint protect. We've had. You know instances where where parents will call and say it's my child's birth. Can we count. Can we are just like she can't. Wait. But that means that other people in the community we would really depend upon to step back. Now and help us continue to me mention. Absolutely -- somebody wanted to make a gift a financial gift to the -- -- theater company activities that you can give online around 24 hours a day anytime you wanna just come to Pollyanna theatre dot ORG. And there's a link to donate now. And theater is spelled with an art he yes it did I hit it to ER. So. Excellent so and it it's Pollyanna theatre dot George year -- theater companies Pollyanna theater company I don't know RG okay. So if you know that you won't be able to make it to the production Peter and the paper which is going on now through July 20 yet. I'm more information at the long center dot board but you wanna make sure that the stability of the -- theater company to create these actions or every year. On both educational and fun for children emotionally inspiring. Make a financial contribution. Go to Pollyanna theater company dot org and you can rest assured that your fans are going to -- -- -- that organization making a real difference for children in this community -- -- -- well Judy I wanna thank you so much for being here it's been a wonderful conversation. Before we close is there anything else you folks to know about Pauline theater company. I am just that it's up -- and it really is a group of people that are. Trained theater professionals. To. I think are just amazing. We have some tremendous actors. And it's a great opportunity to see them at work and we have a lot of adults that come to -- shadows because. They're is always something for adults as well. We believe that good theater is -- theater. And everybody that comes out of the theater should be laughing smiling thinking deeply. And should have had a good time and so. Part of our mission is to speak to the child that is sitting next US embassy but also the child that is still inside about. It's. Nice. Well if you're interested in their current production it is called Peter and the piper and it plays now through July 20. Tickets available apple along centered dot org you can certainly learn more about the Pollyanna theater company and make a donation if you would like to. At Pollyanna theater company dot org and Peter is spelled with an. RE Judy -- Campbell thank you so much for being here and sharing with all of us this wonderful. -- mission that you have always thank you for having me I just. Thanks for listening. I heard on the news -- I -- I -- has found his -- stand. She didn't know it was loaded. I heard on the news about that fourteen year old girl who was bullied online for only a year she can teach -- -- she she got her dad's gun from his nightstand yeah. Yeah he's not. Who -- instruments tasks stolen country's hot -- She accidentally shot his cousin in the hands she Childers and maintain your -- directions I -- round. If you own a gun you have a full time responsibility. When you weren't using it he sure can't get into the hands of curious children troubled teenagers thief or anyone else who might misuse. Your family friends and neighbors are all -- -- remember all of. Rockets for more information on firearm storage safety president CPC don't know. This message brought to you by the national crime prevention council the bureau of justice assistance and -- council. And my -- very pleased. It breaks my heart to tell my cleaned up her now. But I -- gets up -- last year because if -- related macular degeneration. Or AMD's. It's an eye disease that can lead to blindness and affects lots of baby boomers like me is we get older. I wish I'd known there are ways to help prevent named dean and about the warning signs like blind spot or blurry vision. I regret not seeing my eye doctor sooner because early detection is seeking your site. And they are clinically approved treatment for its advanced form. If you think you may have named -- you're not alone. -- the foundation fighting blindness to gain at 1800 blindness for free packet on preventing and managing and team. Series -- just isn't the same without Graham -- teeny. He just breaks my heart. That number again he's 1800. Finance. Don't wait he and be sure doesn't. So there you are got a few bills in your pocket Daniel -- shared on and you happier with your friends. Here and celebrate him a long week -- road blocks the last the few scandalous stories. Knows it. Now fast forward. Jumping your car and head home well all you -- -- got -- DWY mono you wanna hear what's next. Time in jail and then. Left the trips to court up to 171000. Dollars in fees and fines. And months and months of hassles so you wanna keep good times from going all bad let's rewind. Plan ahead when you party with friends lineup a sober driver before you go out for a safe ride home because if you get a DWY. There's no going back drink drive go to jail David asks a message from -- save a life. Did you know there's approximately two million veterans throughout the state of Texas. And 40000 in the Austin area alone till when are you described extracts to support each one of them and their families are conducting dare you to retreat holiday dinners. H -- which he believes a whole family serves and the best way to support the troops is not supporting the family. We support all veterans and active duty soldiers from all branches for more information on our services visit us at -- -- H project that war. Again that's HOH project -- -- One day -- teach chemistry to kids. I'm going to be an architect my dream is to Galicia. This is a world of possibilities but a world in which people who have put their mind to something that can really make a difference. My goal is to help these environments and someday they'll find a cure for cancer yeah. The US department of education's office of federal student -- didn't really believe that inspiring nineteen achieving anything. So we're getting ourselves and making sure everyone has an opportunity to go to college. Each year we provide more than 115 million dollars in grants and loans and works at a time. Higher education possible for any time any decent life. I can go back to college they can change careers and I can make a difference. -- Federal Student Aid and proud sponsor of the American mind. Learn more about money for college student -- got up.

Most Recent Audio

Facebook

Twitter

Contests

1-Thing

Perks